Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

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mediapig
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Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by mediapig »

If one were to use the Armor as DR rules found in the Castle Keeper's Guide (either option) would you have to change the way you handle monsters AC and / or their DR powers?

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redwullf
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by redwullf »

mediapig wrote:If one were to use the Armor as DR rules found in the Castle Keeper's Guide (either option) would you have to change the way you handle monsters AC and / or their DR powers?
My gut says yes. My gut also says "armor as DR" rules always make things more complicated than they need to be, but that is just my opinion. C&C's strength is in its lack of complexity. Though a great tome, with many interesting options, much of the CKG's rule variants will never see the light of day at my table. The game "flies" without all of the options to bog it down. But, as I said, that's my opinion. I'm heavily biased towards the "rules light" nature of C&C, coming from Pathfinder/3rd Edition with their ludicrous minutiae of rules for every...little...thing.
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mediapig
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by mediapig »

I definitely agree... I've been wanting to run a more Sword & Sorcery style game, and I thought the DR rules might give it that kind of feel. But I agree, in general, C&C's strength is its smooth, minimal rules.

cleaverthepit
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by cleaverthepit »

Yes, there are some adjustments. I should have time to post on this tonight - on MY BLOG lol. the tlg blog - i'll cross post here also.

mediapig
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by mediapig »

Thanks man, I look forward to it!

cleaverthepit
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by cleaverthepit »

see my blog for a poor response or
There are two rules addressing using armor for damage reduction in the CnC CKG. In both, the standard armor class rating is dropped to 10 (plus dexterity bonus and other miscellany) for all creatures. Armor no longer adds to one’s armor class.

So what does one do about monsters?

An orc has a standard AC of 11. Many humanoids have standard ACs and wear armor. The standard orc is assumed to wear leather or carry a shield. Hence and 11. The same is the case for many humanoids. So, say with an orc, goblin or hobgoblin, assume they are wearing an armor that equates to a +1 and use the rules as they are in the CKG (you may have to decide exactly which armor they are wearing for accuracies sake and to determine appropriate damage absorbtion).

But what about something like an imp. It has an AC of 15. One can assume a portion of this is related to size and speed. For small creatures I would throw out a +1 to AC. For fast creatures I would throw out a +1-3 for dexterity (this is really a gut call). For the imp I would give him a +2. The imp then would have an AC of 13. Its armor type would be padded or leather as it is an extraplanar creature.

The Jackal, which has a 12 AC and is a natural animal would move to an AC of 10 with an armor of leather. Many natural animal’s AC would be between 10-11 maybe on occasion more depending on the type of skin or exoskeleton they have (giant turtle being one that would be higher) or are very fast (hawk) or are small (viper). The armor type equivalent will depend upon the creature as well. A giant turtle would have better damage absorption (say breastplate) than wolf (about padded). Some animals have thick skin and a thick layer of fat (walrus or mammoth) making their AC low but DA about studded leather or laminar.

Take a night hag though. It has an AC of 22. It is an extraplanar creature but normal sized with no armor. This is a difficult one because that high AC normally makes them a challenge. When the AC ranges this high, an equitable AC and damage absorption must be created to meat the same. I would give it a +2 to AC for normally being 20+ ac extraplanar. I would also throw in a +3 AC for dexterity for an AC of 15. To determine its absorption is not a science (though I think I might be able to come up with a formula). But I would say it would be moderate, somewhere around the chain hauberk.

As you can see, this is not a science though a generally intuitive process. And before I go further, I do believe I will go into this in some greater detail in a Crusader article. In that I will list out proposed Acs and DA values for everything in the MT.
http://trolldens.blogspot.com/

i think i will continue to address this on my blog

Fizz
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Re: Armor as Damage Reduction, CKG question:

Post by Fizz »

I use a modified combat system for my game, one that includes armor as DR. Converting monsters can indeed be a bit tricky at times.

As it happens, D&D 3E is useful for this. 3E explicitly spelled out each component of the AC for every monster. So you'd know how much of the bonus was from armor, natural hide, from it's own agility, or even from it's size.

Usually, i base it on the description of the monster, but once in a while i pull out my old 3E books as a sanity check on my numbers.


-Fizz

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